Author Archives: dtran365

Sharing what I learned

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to the blog: https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/apprenticeship-patterns/9780596806842/ch05s07.html

 

From the blog CS@Worcester – Onwards to becoming an expert developer by dtran365 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Sprint 4 Retrospective

For this week, I have finished up Sprint 3 and I would glad to be talking about it.

What I wish I could done throughout this sprint was to finding

From the blog CS@Worcester – Onwards to becoming an expert developer by dtran365 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Sprint 3 Retrospective

For this week, I have finished up Sprint 3 and I would glad to be talking about it.

What I wish I could done throughout this sprint was to finding

 

 

 

 

 

 

Links:

From the blog CS@Worcester – Onwards to becoming an expert developer by dtran365 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Confronting the limited knowledge

For this week, I have decided to read another pattern from the Apprentice Patterns by Adevele Oshineye and Dave Hoover. It is called “Confront Your Ignorance” for this pattern. I chose this one because since I have read about job titles in the last blog post, I believe that there is a need to go back and understand the basics of knowing what to do with self-awareness when it comes to learning materials.

With this pattern, it starts off with the context of that we identified gaps in our skillset, gaps that are relevant to our daily work. The problem is that we do not know how to begin in working on them while knowing that there are tools and technique to master. By to some extent, some of the people around us already know these things and there is an expectation for the knowledge. To solve this issue, we need to choose one skill, tool, or technique to fill in these gaps for the knowledge. It is necessary to make the trade-offs each day to hone these and be sure that to decide whatever it is alright to dig deeper or fix the other gaps in the future.

From this pattern, what I found interesting is the way it makes a compelling statement towards a real-life scenario. While it is alright to learn when doing the project, it is not appreciated for programmers with the code that may lead to another project instead of the one that was tasked.  Employers may not be okay with understanding if the educational needs is interfering with the project delivery. It is best to have the willingness to put the wider interests of the community. This pattern has changed my mind in approaching in what should I do generally with the knowledge that feels limited. I don’t disagree with anything since it does give a clear sense of being a good step towards in expanding your work to even teaching them to others.

Based on the content of this pattern, I would say this is an excellent read as a refresh in knowing what to do with limited knowledge on projects. This pattern has shown me ways to understand that self-awareness is one of the key things to be successful. For future practice, I will try to be more considerate with separating the practice material and then use those skills from it to give acceptable code for future projects.

Link to the pattern: https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/apprenticeship-patterns/9780596806842/ch02s06.html

From the blog CS@Worcester – Onwards to becoming an expert developer by dtran365 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Knowing what to do with job titles

For this week, I have decided to read “Use Your Title” pattern from the Apprentice Patterns by Adevele Oshineye and Dave Hoover. I have chosen this one because there is a need to know what to do when seeing a job title that is given. I believe this will help me in making sure that when a job is given, it does not feel as stressful from just reading it.

This pattern starts off with the context of being hired or promoted to a position with a title as a result of dedication of learning. The problem is that the job title does not match in what you see for yourself. Because of this, there is the need to apologize or explain the difference from the skill level to the job given. By this explanation, the solution is to not let the title affect you. A job title is not meant to slow down the process or believe that the changes should be big to fully do the work. What is needed to be done is writing down a document that describes the job title and update it time to time.

From this pattern, what I found useful is the way to think about the job title as a way to help you instead of putting you down to stress. It is to make sure that the reflection shows what is it you really do and the skill level is accurate by your standings. Thanks to reading this pattern, I understand that I should be not intimidated by the job titles and instead show that I can improve my organization from one work to the next. Overall, I don’t disagree with anything of this pattern and this is because it helps me understand that the industry is very difficult to choose people that can help with the problems ahead.

Based on the contents of this pattern, I would say this is one that requires thinking from your perspective and it is effective by the end of it. This pattern has given me some ideas to approach in expressing the future jobs that might be needing clarification. For future practice, I should try to write down job positions that I found suited to my skill level and make it clear for myself so that it would not as bad at first glance.

 

 

Link to the pattern: https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/apprenticeship-patterns/9780596806842/ch03s06.html

From the blog CS@Worcester – Onwards to becoming an expert developer by dtran365 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Sprint 2 Retrospective

For this week, I have finished up Sprint 2 and I would glad to be talking about it.

What I wish I could done throughout this sprint was to finding

 

 

 

 

 

 

Links:

From the blog CS@Worcester – Onwards to becoming an expert developer by dtran365 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Sprint 1 Blog Post

For this week, I have finished up Sprint 1 and I would glad to be talking about it.

What I wish I could done throughout this sprint was to know what was figuring out my laptop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link:

From the blog CS@Worcester – Onwards to becoming an expert developer by dtran365 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Finding out with Doctors and Computers

For this week, I have decided to read also “Why Doctors Hate Their Computers” by Atul Gawande. The reason I have chosen to read is because in the world we live in now, we have people that are struggling with the changes towards their job aspects and having to deal with problems that are rather unfavorable to an extent. I believe this article will help me understand from a perspective in making sure the problem is clear and finding out what is the real source of it.

What I think is useful from this article is that the perspective can give a similar scenario that which people can relate to learning and end up become frustrated. So let us say that we have a task that is completely new to our workload and it turns out it is in an another language. It is true that we have just to get some help to translate them, but what if it is another language you must learn prior to that? This is the same from this article when it comes to doctors forced to work with unfriendly software.

What I think is harder from the system is the EMR being reliable with good physician input. Learning what medication to give is easy with enough practice and knowing it is. But getting the records needed is very difficult considering it is just a faxed report. The real customers for this system would be those who need of accommodations. This is because as a community, we tend to have options like sending by email instead of verbally, doing things by paper, giving checklists.

The lessons in this article not only applied to the Electronic Medical Records System but also to all technology that requires records. With the lessons, they should make sure that with whatever technology gives the records as requested instead of being just a general report as part of the system. From reading most of the article, I will say it has definitely changed my way of thinking to the medical record system in hospitals. In the past, I usually think it would be on point with learning what medicine to take and what conditions patients would have but now from this perspective, I can understand why doctors would be frustrated in the updating technology to find records needed.

What I think from this article I will disagree is the purpose of EMR being the best thing to turn to for the sake of getting records. I believe that the EMR is meant for billing instead of medical records since it does feel like it takes the amount of time in seeing the patients, which is important. It could be also medical errors that can lead to false information by the responses the patient gives when diagnosed. For this reading overall, I will say this is a good read in learning the perspective of doctors with technology. This one I believe can be difficult at first to get used to since it is from a perspective, but it provides information that relates to technology that constantly change across.

 

Link to the blog: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/11/12/why-doctors-hate-their-computers

From the blog CS@Worcester – Onwards to becoming an expert developer by dtran365 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Having Concrete Skills

For this week, I have decided to read “Concrete Skills” pattern from the Apprentice Patterns by Adevele Oshineye and Dave Hoover. I have chosen this one since it is a good refresher for understanding that knowledge known is not the same. I believe this will help me in making so that I can be sure to give more demonstration than telling by just writing it out.

This pattern starts with the context of seeking out a role in a group of talented people that will provide better learning opportunities than currently. The problem is that the team, when asked, they can not risk of bringing someone that would not be able to contribute for the intended workload. There is also when thinking further, the possibility of not being able to do even the simplest task when asked. The solution to that problem is concrete skills, acquiring and maintaining them. With these skills, demonstrating and having them will increase the possibility of being trustworthy and be able to reach the goals. Eventually, there will be less dependent on these set of skills as the possibilities increase in being hired for the jobs intended.

From this pattern, what I found useful is the listing for concrete skills as an example to give the point of giving trust to the employer. As we try to give a good impression and trust for the likes of employers, we want to be sure that we at least have a clear understanding and demonstration of the basic things to do like JavaScript and the standard libraries by choice for computing jobs. Skills may require more thoughts to give an even better impression than intended, but it does answer questions to which the employer may ask. This pattern has changed my way of thinking in my profession. As I read the short pattern, it has become clear to me that I should not only directly say as intended but also if needed, demonstrate what I can do even if it is the basic thing. For this pattern overall, there is nothing I don’t disagree upon and this is because the pattern was able to give good perspectives of knowing what to do with this concept.

Based on the content of this pattern, I will say this is a simple but effective one. This pattern has showed good examples of the real-life scenarios. It allows me to be aware in the future of demonstrating than telling by just paper. For practice, I will show some technical work to give good impressions.

 

Link to the pattern: https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/apprenticeship-patterns/9780596806842/ch02s04.html

From the blog CS@Worcester – Onwards to becoming an expert developer by dtran365 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Giving Appreciation to the Patterns

For this week, I have been tasked to read Apprenticeship Patterns written by Adewale Oshineye and Dave Hoover.  What I read from the book was the whole chapter 1 and the introductions of chapter 2-6. They were pleasant to read and they taught a lot of things greatly.  Each of the chapters starts with a general scenario that speaks to the subjects discussed.

What I find useful from reading this book are the general advices we usually hear in life that have been rephrased and it works effectively. These advices really helped my perspective of what to do with multiple languages for my career like for example, finding the time to have a moment of reflection. In some time, when there is a point we feel really stuck in our path, maybe it’s time to step back and reflect on what we can do with the languages we gave effort towards. Reflecting might bring new light to which what you want to pursue next and sure, it can be longer to reach goals from it. But the more we learn, the more potentials we will be able to show to others and ourselves.

Reading this book has changed of how I will now work towards my career. Not only I will try to continue on improving the languages I already know from classes and on my own, but also I will find what languages that are new to me and explore what potentials it can bring if I desire it. I don’t disagree with any of the chapters I had to read. This is because they expressed the scenarios and questions that were simple but well thought out in a sense.

To me, the most relevant chapters would be Chapter 3: Walking the Long Road and Chapter 4: Accurate Self-Assessment. For chapter 3, it definitely gives an understandable perspective when it comes to pursuing a career in the world of technology.  It is true that awards or certificates show that you come far to make a good starting point. But this is only one of the things you can show easily and it’s not everything you can do just by having it. What we want to do is not only appreciate in doing the steps like training but also continue the journey of the path we chose to walk on.  When it comes to Chapter 4, it reminds me of how I tell myself thus far to get where I am today. There is nothing wrong with saying that we want to be better. But comparing ourselves to others, it won’t make a difference unless we put the efforts in and shape our own abilities. What matters is that we show we can improve and become who we want to be.

 

Link to the book: https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/apprenticeship-patterns/9780596806842/#toc-start

From the blog CS@Worcester – Onwards to becoming an expert developer by dtran365 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.