Category Archives: Software Dev

Breakable Joys: what I was missing in my breakable toys

As I picked through the list of Apprenticeship Patterns one of the earlier ones jumped out to me, as it seemed fairly obvious from the name what it was. Upon reading the description I was correct in this assumption and further I had experience with this particular pattern – even if outside of an apprenticeship. That description being a “toy system that [is] similar in toolset, but not in scope to the systems you build at work”. If you were to insert “school” instead of “work”, then I have built breakable toys for the same reason the book describes: to try and fail in private so that your successes can be applied to a real project using the same technologies, but your failures do not come at the expense of said project.

I have a sense already that many of the patterns I pick this semester will be those that I either have experience with or involve skills I feel insecure about. This being a pattern I feel familiar with I hoped to see if I was applying it correctly, and I wasn’t, at least not completely. First, the book stresses that a breakable toy should be like any real toy, fun. I think this is at least one hang up I have had with my own toys is that I try too hard to make them into potentially repurposable that I can use in whatever project I am training for. Instead, I think moving forward I will try first to make something fun, but overengineer it like the book says, such that I can gain as much experience possible from some silly little program.

Additionally, the book mentions making a little wiki as your toy, and this I had never thought of. Initially, I had read this as meaning thoroughly documenting the toy you are building. It makes perfect sense and follows logically one of the best points that has been made to me about learning, which is that the best way to do so is to teach. However, upon subsequent readings I realized they meant developing a wiki with your selected tools. While this certainly would help foster an understanding of yours selected tools, it would clash with the previous goal of being fun, at least in my mind. Instead, despite it being a misunderstanding, I think much could be gained from documenting one’s progress on a breakable toy. Considering I have a spike project to work on currently, I think I will apply these lessons as I begin.

From the blog CS@Worcester – Press Here for Worms by wurmpress and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

A series of relatively unconnected thoughts about the Apprenticeship Patterns readings

This blog contains mostly random thoughts as I did the reading. Nearly each paragraph is a new thought, but they all build to a whole that is effective strategies I hope to adopt or observations about the way the contents relate to my current place in school and work. Please take note as you read this.

I find it interesting that not only did they take the time to address what you should expect to do as an apprentice, but in outlining how your responsibilities change as a journeyman and eventually master they set you up for what you should expect from your mentors and what to strive for as a mentor. They do make a point of saying it is not their intention to write this book to make effective mentors, but I think despite their protestations it does provide a decent lens for the breadth of experiences, however brief their descriptions may be. While I may still be hardly able to envision my life as an apprentice let alone something higher, I hope to remember at least some of these lessons.

As well, one portion stood out to me very specifically as in the process of writing internship applications I had a cover letter I was very confident in, but realized that I could come off as too confident in it and had not emphasized my willingness to learn and accept new techniques. As a result, I will be going back to revise that letter again.

Unsurprisingly, much of these introductions is spent telling you to get out of your comfort zone for a deeper learning experience, but this should be understood innately, so it feels redundant. However, one good idea was to pick up a lesser documented language and try to write the documentation on your own. You could even do this exercise with an already well-established language to solidify your knowledge of it. In fact, more than just languages this is a great idea for any subject, as the old adage goes: “the best way to learn is to teach”. I have found for myself that tutoring a class while here at school was an amazing refresher for the material that I had forgotten since I had taken it so long ago and I picked up new knowledge that I had missed previously.

One thing that did confuse me a little was these chapter’s seeming insistence on remaining a developer rather than moving on to a leadership position or some other “higher ranking” position. Or rather, the utility of this book to those who wish to remain in software development, which makes a little more sense. With the mention of difficulty in keeping or finding good developers, despite a deluge of mediocre ones, made me worried about proving I am worth hiring or having a team that is uninvested in the work or does not possess anything close to mastery over it.

I was particularly struck by the quote at the beginning of Chapter 6, as I have a lot of trouble finding personal motivation without the structure and reward of grading found in school. Therefore, the advice of keeping a reading list is very pertinent to me as perhaps one way of building my own internal mechanisms for remaining engaged in my field and becoming self-motivated.

From the blog CS@Worcester – Press Here for Worms by wurmpress and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Libre Food Pantry Impressions

Upon reading the Libre Food Pantry landing page I was very pleased with the vision and mission sections, as they express the better angels of a computer scientist’s nature. Often times, I get very discouraged by the field as it seems like while many people may just not care, so many more simply want to create and solve problems – but these creations are used to exploit other workers, or invade people’s privacy. “Big Tech”, like all things under capital, takes the creative energy of its workers and uses it to enrich itself at the cost of human dignity, and oftentimes, lives. In a just society, we would value much more the contributions of these open source contributors than the efforts made to perpetuate war and mass surveillance.

…or at least that what I would say BUT if I decided to go to any other tab from the overview and then back, the contents wouldn’t load correctly. Rest assured I will be supporting a bug report.

From the blog CS@Worcester – Press Here for Worms by wurmpress and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Beginning of the End: Software Development Capstone

This feed will contain blogs for my aforementioned Software Dev Capstone course, as it did for the courses I have taken previously. I’m excited to share my experiences in class as well as reflections on the reading materials this spring semester.

From the blog CS@Worcester – Press Here for Worms by wurmpress and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.