The Clean Coder (Week 1)

This was my first time reading this book, and so far, i’ve throughly enjoyed it. Prior to reading the book, I took a stab at what kind of book this would be. Based on the title, i figured that the book will touch base on the qualities of being a person who appreciates their craft. After reading the first two chapters, this book does just that. It explains in details of how one should go about on being professional. One of my favorite lines from the book is on continuous learning.

Would you visit a doctor who did not keep current with medical journals? Would you hire a tax lawyer who did not keep current with the tax laws and precedents? Why should employers hire developers who don’t keep current?

I found this quote to be quite thought-provoking, because i’m a believer that learning is never done. Learning is a life long process and that I too, would hope my doctor would be up to date with his medical journals, and if I have a tax lawyer, that he/she would keep current with the tax laws and precedents. The same thing goes for software developers. The industry is currently changing and concepts that you may have grasped and think you know well, might not be relevant in future frameworks. For example, after doing a little reading about AngularJS two, a javascript framework, migrating from AngularJS one to the newer version won’t be a walk in the park. Things that will work in AngularJS one won’t work in the newer version.

The second chapter touches base with the idea of saying “no” in the workforce. When you are first starting out, you want to excel and meet every expectations and demands that are laid out by your boss. You do so by doing your work to the best of your ability, but when you are given a project with a lot of features to include and you know that father time is not on your side, it’s hard to say no. You end up saying “yes” just to keep everyone happy. By everyone, you mean everyone, but you. This then could result in you being burnt out and have completed it(but did a crappy job), or more commonly, you’re boss and the customer isn’t very happy because you promised x, y and z, but could only deliver x. It’s important to say no, because it could prevent all of the headaches and unwanted meetings with angry customers wondering why something isn’t finished.

 

From the blog CS@Worcester – My Blog by justcodeit94 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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Introduction

My name is Jonathan Paiz and i am a Computer Science Major at Worcester State University.

In this blog, i will be posting my findings on OpenMRS and AMPATH, and infromation on what i have read for that week

 

From the blog CS@Worcester – Site Title by jonathanpaizblog and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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Reflection (Week 1)

All throughout the Fall semester I’ve been mentally prepping myself up for this moment. Now that the time has come, I’m filled with a plethora of mixed emotions (mostly excited). As a Computer Science student, I’m required to take a software development capstone class, AKA CS-448.

Week one has officially ended and i’m very excited to see how the rest of the semester will play out. On the first day of class, we were put into a SCRUM team for an activity where each person on the team had a job. The job consisted of 2 customers, 4 developers, and one monitor. Prior to this activity, I had no idea about SCRUM and its significance, but after the activity, I had a better understanding of this type of framework. After the quick and fun intro to Scrum, we were then placed into teams of 6 where we will be working on features for the OpenMRS project but specifically the AMPATH section.

OpenMRS is the leading open source enterprise electronic medical record system platform. Initially, the community that consisted of volunteers from many different backgrounds started out to fix a database system in a single clinic in Kenya. Over the years, the community of the OpenMRS grew exponentially, ergo allowing this software to expand to other clinics.

If you want to read more about this, heres the link:

Read More

 

From the blog CS@Worcester – My Blog by justcodeit94 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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Week 1 Capstone

We’ve only had two classes so nothing too detailed to cover for the week. Basically we had an intro class where we learned the work for this class will involve the OpenMRS project and more specifically the AMPATH sub project. I reviewed the SCRUM fundamentals because that framework is how our class teams will be approaching work flow. Additionally we chose the teams we will be working with and I am on Team Loading… for the duration of the project. Lastly I got familiar with Slack which is basically an effective messenger for development and professional teams. This is where my team and the rest of the class will post important project information and communicate among each other. Looking into next week I expect to start setting up my environment for JavaScript and Angular 2 as these will be required to contribute to the project.

From the blog CS@Worcester – Software Development Blog by dcafferky and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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The Clean Coder: Chapters 1 & 2

Chapter 1 gives a layout of what a true professional software developer should be and highlights a broad spectrum of attributes one should possess. The first major trait is accountability. More specifically, while bugs are certain to occur it is up to the developer to do everything in their power to see their employer’s problems as their own and take all measures to avoid bugs and errors. When a QA team comes back with a bug, a professional developer should be surprised. The second major trait of a professional developer is testing. It is even suggested to use test driven development (TDD) where tests are basically written before the actual program. There should always be some form of automated testing to ensure software is working correctly prior to QA. Also along with the coding aspect, a professional is always making small changes to the structure of their software to ensure continuous improvement. Lastly, a true professional pursues knowledge and information outside of working hours. It is said to dedicate the 40 normal working hours to your employer and 20 hours for self-growth every week. Within those 20 hours it is also not only important to learn new skills but also practice and sharpen skills already obtained.

After reading chapter 1 I believe there are a lot of takeaways, especially for a student who is seeking good habits before letting bad ones set in. One thing that I am going to look into further is the test driven development approach. I lack the experience and knowledge of appropriate testing and by writing tests first I think it would have nothing but positive effects on my development. I also think the 40/20 hour split is an important habit to start now. Even though as students we are learning many hours already, I still strive to learn outside of the curriculum and this chapter has reconfirmed my actions. I will try to continue if not increase my time spent learning more skills outside classroom studies. Lastly I definitely need to practice more of the skills I have already learned. I often find myself only using something when I need it, forcing me to look simple things up that should be committed to memory. This chapter showed me what I really need to be doing if I want to consider myself a professional by the right definition.
Chapter 2 highlighted a lot of situational awareness of when to say no as a professional software developer. One key point is to search for the best possible outcome when dealing with a supervisor. Additionally, never make false estimates and always stay honest in what you truly believe. Saying or working with the “I’ll try” attitude is recipe for disaster and not the trait of a true professional. Lastly, the chapter is clear that being upfront and consistent with your abilities and timelines is best for everyone involved.

After reading chapter 2 I can definitely see how this advice may come as more of a challenge to a junior developer. They lack the experience to accurately and confidently set time tables for themselves. I think there may be an unavoidable learning curve to the “saying no” mindset however it definitely seems like great advice to follow. Having a systematic approach to development such as using Scrum could also alleviate many of the issues described in this chapter. Working in shorter sprints with continuous contact with the client in the Scrum manner should for the most part prevent a team or developer from being coerced into an impossible task. Also, it is much easier to say no as a team rather as an individual to a supervisor. Great content to think about and to keep in mind when you know you are being pushed to accomplish an impossible task on time.

From the blog CS@Worcester – Software Development Blog by dcafferky and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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Spring 2017 Introduction

This semester I will be continuing to blog. The focus this semester will be my experience working in a SCRUM team. Our team will be working on OpenMRS specifically the AMPATH project. I will also be blogging about the reading I do as a part of the class as well as any topics I find interesting.

From the blog CS@WSU – :(){ :|: & };: by rmurphy12blog and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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CS 448 Intro

Hi it is Gautam again, these blogs will be based on either my class experience or my professional readings over the semester for my capstone. Can’t wait to share it all with you because blogs are so much fun!

From the blog CS@worcester – CS Blog by Gautam by csblogbyg and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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