Intro

Hey everyone! Back for my final semester which means more blogs. By more blogs I mean two a week this time! I will be constantly writing about my experience in my SCRUM team along with my learnings, but also I will be noting information from our book The Clean Coder. I can’t wait to see where this goes, hope you all enjoy!

From the blog CS@Worcester – Kyle Polewaczyk by kpolewaczyk and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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Welcome back to more required blogs!!

Welcome back to my mediocre last minute blogs!

I will be doing a couple things with these blogs moving forward. 

  • Creating informational tutorials or explainations of tools I am currently learning/using.
  • Explaining my current work in my Software Dev. Capstone course work.

I hope to make these easy to follow, and add more flare than my last blogs had …..

From the blog CSWSU – Triforce Code| Exploring and Learning by CSWSU – Triforce Code| Exploring and Learning and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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Clean Coder Chapters 1+2 Week 1

Professionalism:

The term professionalism is the defining factor of responsibility and accountability in the real world. One must own up to their mistakes (potentially being letting a bug slip through). The first rule of professionalism regarding software developers is to not harm the function nor structure of the software being developed. There is no perfect world without mistakes, but as previously stated; own up to them, learn, react accordingly. You should know and trust that the code you release will have nothing left for QA’s to find. This is an industry of continuous learning meaning that out of work practice and reading will be required to stay up to date.

Saying No:

This chapter has a long disaster story about what can happen from premature deployment of software. Afterwards speaking about how managers and developers have roles that are adversarial, or opposing, because their goals tend to conflict on the short terms. The manager wants to release the code to make the deadline, but the code is not ready and you are aware. The higher the stakes of the deadline, the more valuable a no becomes on your end.

From the blog CS@Worcester – Kyle Polewaczyk by kpolewaczyk and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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Professional Team

Week 1:

The introductory week consisted of the set up for the rest of the semester; mainly being building our teams. We built our SCRUM team: ZOLINQ. The sprints will begin shortly but for now we are seeking information on our project which entails coding new features for the AMPATH section of OpenMRS. My team is actively communicating on slack to share information about these organizations.

 

From the blog CS@Worcester – Kyle Polewaczyk by kpolewaczyk and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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The Clean Coder, Chapter 1 and 2 (Week 1)

I read the the introduction, chapter 1 and chapter 2 of the The Clean Coder by Robert C. Martin. I found the introduction funny because the author basically quit the job he did not like while he was making $7,200 a year and and a few months later got the same job back for $6,800 ! I guess the lesson to learn here is the importance of wisdom.

The second and third chapters were about professionalism and when to say no to something (how to be a professional). Being a professional means that you care about the product you build and take responsibility for any problems that may arise. The author explains that to be a professional you must not create bugs in your software and if you make an error, you must apologize. Never release any code that you know to be faulty. And the software you write must be flexible.

The author also talks about the importance of learning. It our responsibility as professionals to make sure we are marketable. We have constantly to learn and strive to improve ourselves.

I found the second chapter interesting. The author explains why it is important to say no to a request by your boss and why not to use the word try. I think following this idea is hard in practice. What if you boss insist you complete something within a certain time limit (which is not possible)? It is very easy to just comply, but it is hard to say no given the fact that your boss has the authority to fire you. But I guess being a professional is not easy, you have to put the software that you produce over everything else.

From the blog CS448 – The blog about software by Sudarshan and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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Week1: Introduction

Hi everybody,

My name is Haider Hussain. This is my introductory blog for CS448 Software Development Capstone. I’m a little late, but excited to start this new blog for this new course. I’ll be posting my entire learning in this courses here.

From the blog CS448 Software Development Capstone – Computer Science World by Haider Hussain and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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A Test Post for Capstone

Hey everyone,

This is basically just a post saying hi and testing to make sure it links to the CS@Worcester blog. I am super excited for this Capstone class and to be working with the OpenMRS group. Excited for the semester ahead!

From the blog CS@Worcester – Tyler Lundstrom by CS@Worcester – Tyler Lundstrom and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

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