Author Archives: computingfinn

Sprint 2 Retrospective

In Sprint 2 we didn’t exactly have tasks to work on or complete. The issue with this is we didn’t really know where to focus our attention. A lot of our spare time was researching testing, and making sure everyone’s servers were working. Once we had the servers working we had no additional reasons to… Continue Reading →

From the blog CS@Worcester – Computing Finn by computingfinn and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Apprenticeship Pattern – Sustainable Motivations

  The pattern I chose this week I thought was interesting from the name. The name is what initially made me want to check out the pattern ‘Sustainable Motivations”. As it would turn out this pattern really resonated with me. Sustainable motivations talks about how you can develop you skills less effectively if you are… Continue Reading →

From the blog CS@Worcester – Computing Finn by computingfinn and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Sprint Retrospective – Sprint 1

Well a not so wonderful start to my Ampath adventure and I think that is putting it lightly. My first experience was filled with errors, problems, and set backs. However what was important in this time of stress was to remain calm and not let me mental dwindle. I was consistently frustrated first trying to… Continue Reading →

From the blog CS@Worcester – Computing Finn by computingfinn and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Baby Programmers – “Individual Apprenticeship Patterns” Breakable Toys

There is a reason that parents wait to buy their children the newest iPhone, or the most expensive toys when they are younger. The reason is they wouldn’t want their children to break those items that they have spent so much money on. This analogy is sort of like new coders and projects, and more… Continue Reading →

From the blog CS@Worcester – Computing Finn by computingfinn and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Do Doctors Hate Their Computers?

Atul Gawande talks in great detail about his experience with Epic and the experience of others that he has talked with. Atul if a surgeon so his direct experience would differ from someone like Sadoughi who is a primary care doctor. He went on to explain what epic was, and that was a system that… Continue Reading →

From the blog CS@Worcester – Computing Finn by computingfinn and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Apprenticeship Patterns and my Reactions

Apprenticeship Patterns: Guidance for the Aspiring Software Craftsman by Dave Hoover and Adewale Oshineye, is an interesting read. The beginning really focuses in on the Craftsmanship of programming. Dictionary.com defines craftsmanship as, a person who practices or is highly skilled in a craft; artisan. Hoovers adapted definition for this word is where the main focus lies. It is still a craft, or art piece, where… Continue Reading →

From the blog CS@Worcester – Computing Finn by computingfinn and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

CS-448 First Blog Post

This is the first blog post for CS448

From the blog CS@Worcester – Computing Finn by computingfinn and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Santa Uses Java?

https://dzone.com/articles/whos-been-naughty-whos-been-nice-santa-gives-you-j

 

Since Christmas was just past I was wondering how Santa could handle so much data so quickly. This blog post seems to suggest that through the use of Java and Speedment is how he accesses this database of children and presents. Speedment is a software tool for enterprises that run Java applications and relational databases. It works by creating a virtual data object, retrieving only the data the application needs when it needs it. What it does is reduces the amount of develop time, increases data access, and builds a better infrastructure. How would Santa use Speedment though? Well he would implement Speedment into java code and call on his database of children in order to gather the information he needed.

An Example:

. var niceChildren = children.stream()

. filter(Child.NICE.isTrue())

. sorted(Child.COUNTRY.comparator())

. collect(Collectors.toList());

 

This stream will yield a long list containing only the kids that have been nice. To enable Santa to optimize his delivery route, the list is sorted by country of residence. What is exciting about a Java application like this is you can create code that easily checks on a database. I had created a SQLite program earlier in the year and the way the code was built felt clunky. In the case of Speedment you can do this process smoother. In terms of software development when looking into database access Speedment seems like a valuable tool to implement. Their website has a code generator for different databases, and languages to make sure you can quickly implement it in any program. I believe this is truly how Santa is able to access his list so quickly to make sure he can check it twice.

From the blog CS@Worcester – Computing Finn by computingfinn and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Lights Camera Action – Model View Controller

https://www.leepoint.net/GUI/structure/40mvc.html

 

A lot of the focus on the end of the year is around the Model View Controller pattern. Our projects have been based on it as well so it is something that we put a lot of focus on. While studying for exams I like to find relations in things that help me to remember them. I thought that the Model View Controller reminded me of a movie production. All the little pieces fitting into their spots so that the whole thing works flawlessly.

MVC, Model View Controller is like the director hierarchy of a coding project. View is similar to the camera being used in a film. It doesn’t know about the controller except for providing methods for the user to use the information. View is used to display all the information that the user needs to see. Basically a more front end version of the code. Where the controller is like the director. When the cameras are rolling the director commands what to do next. Similar to the controller which activates when the view model has a user. It also contains all the relative information to control the operation and make everything run smoothly. Finally Model which is like the set, and actors of a movie. Overall the model contains all the information that is needed for the production or program. Inside of the model is the constructor and the methods needed to be called upon. The article listed also explains the structure in simple terms: “The idea is to separate the user interface (the Presentation in the previous example) into a View (creates the display, calling the Model as necessary to get information), and Controller (responds to user requests, interacting with both the View and Controller as necessary).”

From the blog CS@Worcester – Computing Finn by computingfinn and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

It’s Alive! Mutation Testing

http://pitest.org/

Mutation testing is something that we learned the last day of classes. In a short and simple definitions mutations are seeded into your code and then tests are run on that mutated code. If the mutated code fails the tests you have then a mutation is killed, and if the mutated code passes then the mutation lived. From here you can gage what kind of quality your code is, and how well it responds to mutations. The higher percentage mutations killed the better overall quality is you code. However what are mutations exactly? Mutations are automatically modified versions of your code that make changes with the intention of making your code fail. The code that is changed is then called a mutation. The reason that you would use mutation based testing is to make sure your tests are capable of finding faults. Traditional test coverage measures only what code is executed by your test. Mutations are particularly useful in testing tests with no assertions, and partially tested code. Partially tested code being only testing certain branches of code and not all of the branches. A leading brand name and common mutation test suite is PIT what puts PIT ahead of the competition is its fast, easy to use system that is actively developed and supported. Pits UI is not complex and shows an easy to read file of mutations.

photo

Mutation testing is a fun gimmick of a name, and also a useful tool for testing the validity of your code. Expanding beyond just expected to results but to unexpected results.

From the blog CS@Worcester – Computing Finn by computingfinn and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.