Category Archives: cs-wsu

Read Constantly

An algorithm is a set of rules to be followed in order to solve mathematical problems in numerous steps that usually involve repetition of an operation. Sometimes algorithm problems do not show up at the beginning of a project. As Steven S. Skiena states, different programmers find them out as subproblems, which appear to be … Continue reading Read Constantly

From the blog cs-wsu – Kristi Pina's Blog by kpina23 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Dig Deeper

We live in a world where different complex software projects have different deadlines and they use a variety of tools to finish the projects. Most of the time employers cannot afford to hire too many specialists to fill every role. You learn only enough about any tool to get today’s job done. You select some … Continue reading Dig Deeper

From the blog cs-wsu – Kristi Pina's Blog by kpina23 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Draw Your Own Map

According to my next Apprenticeship Pattern blog I chose “Draw Your Own Map,” as one of the most interesting patterns and which fits perfectly in my logic. When you decide to enter the Software Development world, you may think that it’s a hard and tough game, or sometimes you believe that your career will always … Continue reading Draw Your Own Map

From the blog cs-wsu – Kristi Pina's Blog by kpina23 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Sustainable Motivations

There are many things that can motivate us to be programmers. Some of them can motivate for the long term, while others may not be sustainable. We may become very good at a particular language or framework. This specific expertise may very well translate to a larger paycheck. But if your true goal is mastery … Continue reading Sustainable Motivations

From the blog cs-wsu – Kristi Pina's Blog by kpina23 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Craft over Art

If you consider yourself to be a programmer or developer, you are not an artist. Programming is a craft, a type of art, but it cannot be classified as a fine art. It can be more constructive than artistic. As an programmer you will be paid to build something that helps the customers to have … Continue reading Craft over Art

From the blog cs-wsu – Kristi Pina's Blog by kpina23 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Sprint 6 Retrospective

Since the last sprint retrospective, our group has been working to finalize everything that we have managed to get done so far. Most everything we do have to show for actually was created since the last sprint retrospective. Just about everything before then has been all about fixing errors, trying to understand Google’s material design and how to use it, setting up the development environment and fixing lots of errors. Another team had a working version of their component already, and our team was stuck on an error trying to get the styling to work correctly. The problem was that we were opening the component directly in the browser, just by opening the html file that has the component in it. There’s no connection between the styling code and the HTML code, so there’s no reason it would be properly formatted just from opening it directly, and that was the thing we were having a problem with. It turned out we had to use ng serve to start up the local amrs server, and then the component would show up correctly formatted after visiting localhost:4200. There were of course some more errors in the process of getting to this point, though, which I figured out through a series of Google searches and copying and pasting commands from stackoverflow answers from other people who had a similar problem. Since we got that working and were able to finally see our component correctly, we finished figuring out how to get Google’s material design template code integrated into the component, and then spent the last class officially adding our component to the main branch. The rest of the work we have been doing since then has been about preparing for the final presentation, recalling everything we have done so far and trying to allocate the material among all five of us to discuss when presenting. Most of the presentation is going to be talking about errors and the solutions to the errors and how the solutions to the errors were found. That is because most of this project has been about having errors, looking for the solution to the errors, having more errors with the solution, and then finding the right way to do things. Another portion of the presentation will be about setting up the development environment, which was a pretty big focus in this project. We spent the first couple of weeks setting up a development environment we never used, and then had to set up another development environment once we started working on the angular component. The rest of the presentation will be mostly about the actual programming of the component; what it is, what it is supposed to be for, and what further problems were had in developing it.

This class is very different from any other class I have had before, mainly because the whole time there was never a clear idea of what anyone is supposed to be doing or how anything is supposed to be done. It all seems to have worked out in the end, though.

From the blog cs-wsu – klapointe blog by klapointe2 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Sprint 6 Retrospective

This week I will be talking about our last sprint. This sprint may not even be done yet since even now, some of us are still trying to work on the issues on git hub. This sprint is unlike the others, I think we actually accomplished more during this sprint. As I have said before, most of our past sprint consists of waiting for the customer to respond or try to plan something for the intake form but then have to change it because the customer does not need it.

During this sprint, I worked on fixing the student ID of the intake form. The student ID field was getting the input as a number but there is a problem with a number as an input. The first problem is that a number can not start with a 0, it will only start at 1 or any number that is not 0. Our actual student ID starts with a 0 so that would not work. The other problem is that we want to capture the student ID after a student swipes their card. After turning the student ID input field into text, I had to then remove all the unnecessary characters that are inputted by swiping their OneCard. This can be done by using the slice method that is from javascript but you can use it in typescript, I think most javascript functions can be used in typescript. The student ID that we get from the card reader is in the format of “;0000111111100?”. The only characters we want is from 5 to 12, which is the actual student ID that you will get from OneCard. Then, I tried using the function slice to get only those characters.

After turning the field into text and slicing the character, I was able to make it work by adding the following code into the onSubmit function since I only want it to happen after they submit the form so that it would look clean on the database.

Code inside onSubmit: this.model.studentId = this.model.studentId.slice(4, 3);

The next thing that I did was to create a way for the food pantry to be able to enter the student ID on their own. Sometimes students might not have their OneCard with them. So, I created an if statement in the onSubmit field, I did not want to do it on the actual form with the ngIf  because it gets messy with the ng-template stuff.

Code: 

if (this.model.studentId.charAt(0) === ;) {

    this.model.studentId = this.model.studentId.slice(4, 3);

}

This was the final code that I pushed into master. I was actually working on other things, like checking if they entered a letter, if they did, create an alert.

This sprint was very interesting to me. I learned a lot of things. The thing that stuck with me the most is making sure that the field would only take what it is supposed to. After working on it, I would like to add more stuff to check the ID field, like if the length is greater than or less than 8 then it is invalid if it contains other symbols that is not
“; or ?”. There is still a lot of work to do for the intake form but I enjoyed it.

From the blog CS@Worcester – Computer Science by csrenz and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Retrospective 6

We entered the last sprint for our capstone class. Everybody was happy because we were two weeks from the end of school and most o us are ready to graduate. But, we still had to work and to deliver some working code and well-implemented components and integration. As I and my team started to work … Continue reading Retrospective 6

From the blog cs-wsu – Kristi Pina's Blog by kpina23 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Retrospective 5

The AmPath simple application is evolving. We started from scratch and now each team in the class is pushing the components one by one. Even though not everything is fully implemented, we are trying to commit and share with other teams parts of the work. As my team was waiting or other teams to commit … Continue reading Retrospective 5

From the blog cs-wsu – Kristi Pina's Blog by kpina23 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

“Retreat into Competence” Apprenticeship Pattern

I am writing this blog post about the “Retreat into Competence” apprenticeship pattern from the Apprenticeship Patterns book. To summarize the idea of this pattern, it is about handling being overwhelmed by new challenges. This is something I experience frequently, particularly because I actively search for new challenges and often find ones that are beyond my current ability. The recommended response is to go do something else that is more familiar instead. Succeeding at something familiar and reflecting on past success is comforting in the face of overwhelming ignorance. There are two definitions of the word “overwhelming” that I can imagine here, and the one that this chapter seems to be using is in an emotional sense. Recognizing one’s own incompetence is uncomfortable, so taking a moment to go back and successfully complete a familiar task feels better than struggling with an unfamiliar one. The other definition would be being overwhelmed in the sense of lacking the capacity to complete the given challenge. Retreating into competence is done for the sake of regaining confidence, and it is important to be able to handle being emotionally overwhelmed before trying to handle being academically overwhelmed. I have confidence in myself and my abilities, but when I am challenged by something new, I remain confident in what I know and recognize that it is a challenge because of what I do not know. I was doing a problem recently that required a certain background knowledge of combinatorial game theory that I did not have. Despite my aptitude for problem solving, my lack of education on the matter made the problem challenging (or overwhelming) to the extent that talent would not make up for inexperience. I saw it as a learning opportunity and started researching the information that I was not familiar with, and also did some easier problems instead that did not require a level of education I was lacking. Remaining in one’s own comfort zone is a good thing, but only briefly, as the chapter notes. It is taking a step backwards in order to prepare to continue moving forward and learning.

From the blog cs-wsu – klapointe blog by klapointe2 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.