Category Archives: Docker

Docker

In class, for our activities and homework, the professor told us to download Visual Studio Code and Docker that we were going to use for the semester. I did not know what Docker was and what its purpose was going to be in this class. I was interested in learning more about Docker and why it is such a professional tool in software development.

In software, Docker is an open platform for developing, shipping, and running applications. It enables us to separate our applications from our infrastructure so we can deliver the software quickly. It is a set of platforms as a service product that use OS-level virtualization to deliver software in packages called containers. Containers are isolated from one another and bundle their own software, libraries and configuration files; they can communicate with each other through well-designed.

In a way, Docker is a bit like a virtual machine. But unlike a virtual machine, rather than creating a whole virtual operating system, Docker allows applications to use the same Linux kernel as the system that they’re running on and only requires applications be shipped with things not already running on the host computer.

And importantly, Docker is open source. This means that anyone can contribute to Docker and extend it to meet their own needs if they need additional features that aren’t available out of the box.

I chose this article because I was curious about Docker and wanted to know more about it. So, from all the sources that I could have found, this one has all the details about docker, docker containers, how needed it is in software development, and why it is so desired in companies.

Now that we know what Docker is, let’s understand why it is used and needed for software. Docker streamlines the development lifecycle by allowing developers to work using local standardized environments, using local containers which provide our applications and services.

I think one of the reasons Docker is important, is that it can get more applications running on the same hardware than other technologies, and makes it easier to package and ship programs, which is a high potential. Companies use Docker a lot in software where they do a lot of programming and applications because it makes the work easier and more portable.

As a computer science major, what I understood about Docker even though I have never used it, it’s a great platform when it comes to running applications and can do many of them at the same time. I am still getting used to it with the activities that we do in class and love to see how it works and its roles.

Docker containers, images, and registries | Microsoft Docs

From the blog CS@Worcester – Gracia's Blog (Computer Science Major) by gkitenge and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

Docker Explained.

This week in class we’ve gone over UML Diagrams and the importance of being able to translate back and forth between writing code from the diagram and making a diagram based on the code. The professor told us to download Visual Studio and Docker, which I’m assuming will be used for the entirety of the semester. I didn’t have a single clue as to what Docker was or why it may have been needed. After a brief explanation prof told me to do a little bit of reading myself and so I did. I’m by no means not a Docker expert but the picture has become a bit clearer.

Docker is a container based application that allows you to run services independent of each other. Containers tend to be pretty compact and only carry the information neccesary for a service to work. Docker containers are created through docker images. An image is basically just a template that tells the system how to make the container. An image can consist of many layers, of which each layer is just a previous working version of the image. It’s important to note that an image is read-only. The purpose of the image is to load the container. The top most layer (when the container is created) is what the user works with, whether it’s making changes to the container itself or using the tools that come with the container. When reading about how this technology works the thought of how something like this could be secure kept on swimming through my mind but as each layer of the image is created it becomes a completely new and immutable image. I’m still not entirely sure how this works and will have to spend more time trying to understand, but for now I’ll just take it for what its worth.

Where Docker really becomes a useful tools is in its portablilty and reusabilty. For example, the use of a virtual machine to run certain programs or applications isn’t frowned upon, but it does tend to be costly in terms of using space and memory. A 500MB application could take heaps of memory to run because the guest OS and libraries would need to run before being able to use a desired application. If you wanted to run multiple instances of that application you would need to run multiple VMs. That’s where Docker delivers and gives the user what they need in terms of reusability.

Now Docker containers are not a one stop shop when it comes to solving issues. If a user is trying to use multiple servers and tries to adminstrate them only using Docker containers, they will find themselves in a pinch due to the stripped down capabilties of a container. A container only holds enough information for what actions are necessary to ensure task completion in terms of portabilty. In a scenario like this you would probably want to stick with using a VM to get the full use of the OS and all it’s resources to maintain multiple servers.

Here’s two videos that brought me up to speed on just what type of software Docker is and why it is extremely useful in just over 15 minutes. The explanations are given in a low level manner that allows people like me who couldn’t even begin to understand the concept grasp it better. I hope you enjoy the content, I did!

Containers vs VMs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjXI-yxqGTI
Containerization Explained https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0qotVMX-J5s

From the blog CS@Worcester – You have reached the upper bound by cloudtech360 and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.