Category Archives: Week12

Clean Coding- Coding Blocks

Episode 49 – Clean Code – Comments Are Lies

 

 

Coding blocks podcast is presented by Joe Zack, Michael outlaw and Allen Underwood. In this podcast episode, the authors discuss about creating good and clean code and eliminating as much comments as possible. Initially, I was very confused with this concept by pro developers because in my first intro to java class, my teacher emphasized on making sure that we adequately commented thoroughly on methods and functions that we wrote. There were even points that was taken for now properly commenting codes then all of a sudden, my CS 443 my professor tells me that commenting is not really a good practice since your code should be written so well that understanding the though process and program should very easy. But the more I thought about this, the more I understood what was being taught by the teacher and now this podcast episode. No one writes comments for print statements because it’s so rudimentary that, everyone basically understands it by looking at it. That’s how our algorithms should be designs. Code Readability and understanding should be the goal of all developers who walk out of school. Again using comments in clean code has its pros and cons. They almost never get updated while the code gets updated and fix. They tend to mislead because they are not often updated. They propagate lies and misinformation’s because as the code gets modified and updated, they are often left untouched. The only exception to this rule of thumb is when one is coding a public API that would be used by other developers. Comments are looked as a way for programmers to make up for their shortcomings in programing. If methods and variables are named and designed properly there would be no need commenting. Time used to create comments can be used to optimize the software program to increase its readability and logic flow. Another bad thing about comments is when they are not obsolete but just misleading. Also inaccurate comments put the developer in the wrong frame of mind and logic. The proper approach is utilizing refactoring and clean code techniques that build program structure and design instead of attempting to explain bad coding with comments. Ultimately, it makes sense that developers wanted to explain their thoughts and processes with comment but its just more effective when the thought process is explained in the logic and functionality of the codes and method.

 

 

Link – Episode 49

https://player.fm/series/coding-blocks-software-and-web-programming-security-best-practices-microsoft-net/episode-49-clean-code-comments-are-lies

From the blog CS@Worcester – Le Blog Spot by Abranti3 Dada Kay and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.

#6 – Testing Talks

Testing Talks – Episode 169 With JeanAnn Harrison.

 

In this week’s testing podcast episode, Joe interviews JeanAnn, a Software testing manager who has been in the software quality assurance field for over 2 decades. JeanAnn begins by addressing techniques and best practices that make for a fluid testing process. I chose this particular episode because JeanAnn addressed automation in testing and critical thinking in testing. With the development of modern technology, software automation is the next big thing in the world today.

Another big thing she talked about was critical thinking. Critical thinking often refers to the ability to try different thought processes and develop new methodologies to achieve an already familiar goal. The ability to think outside the box, pushing yourself to look at things in a different way. To evolve ones thinking ability in testing, we can try to look at things outside the software-testing field. By doing this, one is able to develop logical means that are often necessary to find product boundaries and limits. Asking yourself questions like how? , when? , what ? , where ?. These simple questions often answers most of the questions for the software testers and help develop solutions and bugs that need to found. By asking these questions, you are able to see how the software or product could be integrated into computer systems, the kind of problems that can arise by implementing the new product/technology and what can be done to resolve issues should they arrive. Another big thing that she addressed was understanding software’s users and customer base. Developing apps and programs without expected audience leads to many problems in the software world. Imagine developing a mobile application for 70 year olds but its integrated into the latest iphone technology. This would not work out because most of the people in that range no longer have the ability to adapt to new technology or even use a cellular device. Again imagine developing a walker for blind people which has an activation switch installed on the side with an on and off reading. This will be physically challenging and difficult for the blind to optimally use the product. It might be the best product that all blind people needs but its inability to incorporate and account for the blind would instantly make it a bad design or a bad product to acquire. Simply put if you know your user base, you are able to find out what needs to be designed for the product to properly fit the needs of the users and customers.

 

 

LINK

 

https://testingpodcast.com/169-critical-thinking-in-testing-with-jeanann-harrison/

From the blog CS@Worcester – Le Blog Spot by Abranti3 Dada Kay and used with permission of the author. All other rights reserved by the author.